Pages: (2) 1 2  ( Go to first unread post )
Add Reply
New Topic
New Poll

 The new mutant metaphor? Mutants are TERRORISTS
Kaiolino
 Posted: Apr 4 2017, 02:46 PM
Quote


#ReplaceRogue
Posts: 9338






QUOTE
There is kind of a paradigm shift where it's no longer feared and hated civil rights type movement motif like X-Men started with. It's more like the mutants are terrorists. They are weapons of mass destruction -- humans of mass destruction -- and the people that hate them aren't bigots. They just care about the safety of humans.


Better round up those terrorists Artie and Leech.
PM
^
Lycaon pictus
 Posted: Apr 4 2017, 04:38 PM
Quote


Still Endangered
Posts: 3815




I have so much to say about this and its real-world parallels, and how 'super hero' stories get told these days (particularly in movies where they've seen the most significant financial success in recent years) but it's unorganized and there's some kind of bug biting me right now.

Instead I'll just say two things: that common critique of the mutant metaphor not making sense because of course people should be afraid of people with powers, and the common X-fan critique about wanting the mutants in their own universe away from other supers so that metaphor makes more sense has never held water with me. I've always thought is was essential to the mythos that mutants exist in a universe with other super powered being and those beings are beloved (or at least treated with ambivalence) for the very same reason mutants are hated and feared. It made perfect sense to me. Why? Because bigotry is not rational. It spoke to me instantly as a Black woman, to see one group pilloried for the very same traits and behaviors another group is praised for. I've always thought that was one of the smartest things about the franchise.

Second, I think superhero stories in general--not just the X-Men--have strayed from the light a bit. Especially when you take into account the films. You all know I hate the recent Man of Steel and thought BvS was a hot mess (just not as hot a mess as MoS) because it stomps all over Superman's character and is generally bleak and tells its story poorly. But it's also a great window into how we tell these stories now, specifically the massive property damage in the 3rd act. It also ties into the Civil War movie. It's like....more than ever before, the stories are a kind of fascist 'might-makes-right' morality play. The Good Guys have to stop the Bad Guys because they are Good, and any damage is just collateral. And those Good Guys aren't held to any moral standard (Zod neck snap) because we the audience are meant to vibe with their inherant Goodness. I think it's a very salient (unintentional) commentary on the military industrial complex and the war on terror tbh. Heroes don't help people. Heroes kill Bad Guys while people scurry and flee in terror.
PM
^
Filthy Mutie
 Posted: Apr 4 2017, 04:47 PM
Quote


Moderator
Posts: 2773




QUOTE (Lycaon pictus @ Apr 4 2017, 07:38 PM)
that common critique of the mutant metaphor not making sense because of course people should be afraid of people with powers, and the common X-fan critique about wanting the mutants in their own universe away from other supers so that metaphor makes more sense has never held water with me. I've always thought is was essential to the mythos that mutants exist in a universe with other super powered being and those beings are beloved (or at least treated with ambivalence) for the very same reason mutants are hated and feared. It made perfect sense to me. Why? Because bigotry is not rational. It spoke to me instantly as a Black woman, to see one group pilloried for the very same traits and behaviors another group is praised for. I've always thought that was one of the smartest things about the franchise.


I agree, but especially with this.

I never understood the argument against this working.

You can get more granular in-universe about it if you must, too, like Morrison did - mutants were something different and "taking over" in the long-term, and weren't fellow "obsolete" humans like Captain America, et al.

Or, simply, the praised ones are humans and got their powers through things that regular humans can get their head around - accidents, the government, inventions, money - whereas mutants get their powers from "somewhere" that calls their understanding and/or beliefs into question. Evolution? Pollution? God's will?

The original X-Men comic was built on nuclear guilt. What have we done to our world, our children? It evolved (pun intended) from there, naturally, to encompass the various ways people are marginalized.

Anyway, yours is the simpler, matter-of-fact version of why it works fine. The in-universe bend-over-backwards-ish way is super easy, too.
PM
^
AgentFeliX
 Posted: Apr 4 2017, 06:10 PM
Quote


Damn. I might start carryin' beans.
Posts: 2722




I concur as well. The reasoning holds water, in a vacuum, but in the Marvel U it's hypocritical. But (and I told Kai this earlier) I could also just see it as them doubling down on old status quos and franchise regression. We all know that Morrison changed the metaphor from hated and feared, to being a trendy popular counter culture. That has ebbed and flowed over time, but Mutants have seen for the most part, far more acceptance than the pre-2001 Marvel world. I haven't listened to the clip yet, mind you. But I could see them as regressing back to that. Although his words explicitly say not protecting those that "hate and fear" them? So idk. Just babbling about bullshit I guess.
PM
^
sweetdumbass
 Posted: Apr 4 2017, 09:39 PM
Quote


X-Men Discourse
Posts: 9627




tbh I always thought it was really dumb post Genosha/Planet X that parallels weren't clearly drawn between anti mutant prejudice and global rampant islamophobia/anti arab racism like the similarities were obvious but I mean I guess we really needed that whole mutant Jesus metaphor and to prop up other less relevant or successful franchises.

--------------------
Why is your penis on a dead girl's phone?
PM
^
AgentFeliX
 Posted: Apr 4 2017, 10:01 PM
Quote


Damn. I might start carryin' beans.
Posts: 2722




QUOTE (sweetdumbass @ Apr 5 2017, 01:39 AM)
tbh I always thought it was really dumb post Genosha/Planet X that parallels weren't clearly drawn between anti mutant prejudice and global rampant islamophobia/anti arab racism like the similarities were obvious but I mean I guess we really needed that whole mutant Jesus metaphor and to prop up other less relevant or successful franchises.


would have worked pretty well. Pretty sad that Geoff Johns wrote a story with those themes in GL but X-Men didn't
PM
^
Filthy Mutie
 Posted: Apr 5 2017, 09:19 AM
Quote


Moderator
Posts: 2773




Maybe the existence of Ultimate X-Men discouraged them to get more "political" in 616 at the time.
PM
^
Filthy Mutie
 Posted: Apr 11 2017, 11:19 AM
Quote


Moderator
Posts: 2773




Thoughts on this now that the issue is out and we've read it?
PM
^
Kaiolino
 Posted: Apr 11 2017, 12:33 PM
Quote


#ReplaceRogue
Posts: 9338




It wasn't as bad as I expected. Also seems Guggenheim has much more embracing of the mutant metaphor in interviews he's done the past week.
PM
^
PatriX
 Posted: Apr 18 2017, 02:05 PM
Quote


Another "x" in statistix
Posts: 2005




Oh dear, what is terrorism?
Probably, the first thing that came to your mind, was muslim-tier terrorism, ie.
"drive and explode"

Terrorism. There is so much terrorism.
Satanic Terrorism. Kids rebelling against christianity.
Scumfuc Terrorism. Kids from shitty homes rebelling and causing ruckus against normal people.
Untouchables Terrorism: lepers, aids, misfits, unwanted, people who should not be.
Music Terrorism. Grindcore, a concept, where you flush down the toilet the concept of the music (verse / chorus / verse), and you succeed

What is terrorism? Is it disturbing the peace?
Is it being on the wrong side? One's terrorist is another revolutionary.
I never trusted either terrorists, nor revolutionaries, but I did like the X-Men, because of their universal nature.

The X-Men, for me, they were unwanted. They were "better off dead"
The things is, they were heroes, because they did the right thing, even if it wasn't easy, and they were hated for it.
They did, what no one else had balls to do it, and in gratitude, they were killed.

Are X-Men terrorist? For marvel citizens, they always were.
"At least, Avengers were registered".
But the problem is not the X-Men. The problem is (and I said it numerous times) that we have Purifiers, Brotherood of Evil Muslims,
Marauders, Technarchs, Sentinels, Friends of White Humanity, Osamas Bin Magneto in our world, but we lack X-Men, X-Factor, X-Force.
On our earth, we have all the super-villains you can dream of, but none of the superheroes.

Pardon, there was a hero
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Giovanni_Falcone
But he died tragically. And surprise surprise, The X-men actually had balls to address such issues, which makes them superior
to other cape comics. Enough, that I never lost my interest in them, even when I started reading Ellis, Ennis, etc.

This is the X-Men for me. But the beauty is, that they can be something completely else for you. And it will work.

What makes them work is because, like every good piece of sci-fi, at its core, it's about humanity. You can have super-technology,
you can have super-powers, you can have different timelines, clones, aliens, etc. But always, you will have the same desires, needs,
wishes. And the question is, how a human being, finds out himself / herself in a new, different situation?

We might have a teleport device, jetboots, wings, clones, but at the core, we are the same as we always were. Our motivations are the same.
Only tools change. At its core it's about humankind's condition. About spiritual and ethical condition.
X-Men might be homo superior, but they have the same problems as homo sapiens.

--------------------
formerly known as Chakal
I am a relic.
PMEmailWebsite
^
0 User(s) are reading this topic (0 Guests and 0 Anonymous Users)
0 Members:

Topic Options
Pages: (2) 1 2 
Add Reply
New Topic
New Poll